Gear for Climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro – Clothing

Planning my hike of Kilimanjaro and the subsequent safari was not an easy task.  Good research was key.  That research took many forms:  talking to people who have hiked Kili, reading blogs or websites about hiking, talking to the great folks at REI, and the list and advice given to me by the trek organizer (Trekking for Kids).  In the end, I still had many decisions to make on what felt could be important things.

So, this post is geared (sic) to those contemplating climbing Kilimanjaro to reach its peak:  Uhuru Peak, an adventure that requires both cold and hot weather gear.  I will attempt, as an amateur, to share over a couple of posts what made it to my packing list and how it helped.  This post will focus on clothing.  If you are reading this and planning a similar trek, please feel free to leave any questions as comments and I will reply and try to help.  In addition, should you have other suggested items or even better suggestions than mine, please share!

Before I get on to that, a few key items:

  • I did a safari after the hike so I include in the list things for that very different experience.
  • Kili has multiple climate zones ranging from hot to extreme cold.
  • I am not laying out all the options possible, especially in clothing, but will share what all the advice led me to.
  • I did write about my 7 top items to take on this hike.  It was a high-level view of the question but hopefully this will get more details!

Clothing – Lower Body

From the bottom up:

  • Hiking boots – Get good ones and do your practice hikes with them so you break them in well.  Otherwise you may suffer more during the hike, including dreadful blisters.  Some folks went for shoes that were more like hiking shoes but I like the safety of the ankle support since I am bound to get sloppy and then twist my ankle when tired!


  • Gaiters – These help keep mud and scree from doing a number on you.  You will need them at summit for sure and probably on the first day if it has rained recently (it had not for us so I did not use them that day).
  • Socks – Socks for the hike and the safari were very different types.  For the latter, you may not need to be told what to get.  But for the former, remember to use a liner to wick moisture from the feet and then woolen socks over them.  For summiting or the colder days, you need very thick woolen socks.  I was still a little cold in my feet even with these.
  • Pants – A rainproof outer shell was a must to avoid getting soaked.  However, it does not need to keep you warm (I used under layers to handle the cold).  The outer shell is about rain and, also, wind.  I got a hard shell (you can get a soft shell instead if you want).  When I was not using the outer shell (which was most of the time), I used hiking pants as my exterior layer.  Zip-off hiking pants are great for quick adaptability if it gets too hot during the day but also because I could save carrying pairs of shorts for the safari later :)


  • Base layer for the legs – Base layers (long leggings) made from merino wool (the best) will be important to keep me warm.  This layer, given the material, will also keep odors from building up which makes them re-usable for more than one day (saving the load of what needs to be carried by the porters and taken in my luggage on the trip to/from Africa).  You can use polypropylene for this layer but I hear merino wool just performs better.  On summit day, you may need two layers of base layer.  I wore two under the hiking pants and then the hard shell on the outside.  I was consistently told before the trip that silk is about the best material to help retain warmth next to the skin.  I was surprised when I heard that.  I just happened to have this pair of silk leggings but, once on Tanzania, our lead guide told me to use the two merino layers I had instead of the silk pair and one merino pair.  It worked well enough for me on summit night!


  • Shorts for safari – I wore shorts during the safari (the zip-off hiking pants and an extra pair) but I also did wear my full hiking pants to better protect me from the sun (and bugs, I suppose).  Of course, shorts will also be things you wear in the evening or when exploring towns.

Clothing – Upper Body

  • Base layer- The upper body layering approach is much like the lower body’s.  I used base layers for the colder days – again merino wool.  Usually one but two on summit night!
  • Mid layer – I got a merino wool mid-layer to have for the evenings at camps lower than base camp. On summit night, this jacket would serve as the mid layer between the skin-hugging base layers and the outer layers I will mention next.


  • Outer layers – For lower altitudes, a regular long sleeve CoolMax shirt.  If needed, a base layer under it.  I had a hard shell for rain and wind.  I also had a synthetic down jacket which was great because it was very compact when packed.  I could use it in the evenings while at camp on cold nights and, of course, on summit night.  To summarize for summit night:  two merino wool base layers, the merino wool light jacket, the hard shell (for wind, not rain), and the synthetic down jacket – which I was not wearing at the beginning of the ascent but which I wore during breaks and once it got too cold even while moving.
  • Shirts for safari – I had quick-dry short sleeve shirts that also had side vents – very comfortable in warm weather and preventing odors from building up…


    • Head- and neck- gear –  I used different items to cover my head from the cold and from the sun – both very important.  A typical sun hat to protect against the sun (with a rim) was a very good idea.  A skull cap was one of the items I used in cold weather.  In very windy or in rainy conditions, the hood from the hard shell helped a good deal.  I also had a buff which I used when the skull cap seemed like a little much.  In fact, the buff served many purposes, like loosely hanging around my neck to avoid burning up when in the sun.  I also used it to cover my mouth and nose when it got dusty on the trail or in the safari.  Finally, I brought a balaclava for summit night.  It would offer lots of protection with only a small space open to look out.  I could also just use it around my neck (would keep it warmer than the buff would).  So quite a few options!
    • Outer gloves –  You are going to want some extreme gloves! The gloves should be waterproof because you don’t want gloves getting wet where it is cold! And some good heavy duty insulation (e.g., PrimaLoft). You will still need liners underneath (you would think an extreme glove would be enough…).  My fingertips were still a little cold on summit night even with the liners! But that eventually passed as I entered “the zone” (read how summit night unfolded!)  You also need to decide on the type: mitt or separate-fingers. For that outer layer of gloves, I chose mitt. Plus: less “surface” exposed to the outside, so keeps more warmth around your fingers. Minus: Lower usability of your fingers since they cannot move independently. However, my rationale for mitts was that most of the time, I would be holding hiking poles in my hands during the ascent and for that, the mitt grip worked. Once I wanted to reach for tissues or take a photo, yes, I would have to take the mitts off but that was not a big deal. Even fingered style gloves may have been too thick for some of these motions.


  • Liners – I only used the extreme gloves summit night but the liners I used a lot on the days and evenings prior to summit night.  Maybe bring two pairs of liners of different thicknesses, or one pair of liners and one pair of lighter gloves.  The Grabber hand warmer thingies that generate some heat can be helpful though they do not always seem to generate the same level of heat at high altitude.  Nevertheless, any heat helps so you may want to bring some.

Clothing – sleep time

OK, do I really think you need help with this?  No and yes.  No, because sleep wear is such a personal comfort thing.  But yes because part of it is slightly counter-intuitive.  When you are sleeping in the super-cold weather sleeping bag at night at the higher altitudes and on colder nights, the less you wear, THE BETTER.  No, no, nothing kinky about that statement.  Simply the interior of the super-cold weather sleeping bag will make you feel your own body heat warming you as it leaves your body.  So the more clothing you wear, the less your body heat will work with the sleeping bag to keep you warm.  Other than that, keep the jackets, pants, etc. close to the sleeping bag because when you wake up in the middle of the night to relieve yourself (and, trust me, you WILL if you are taking Diamox), you will need to put those on because you will not be able to go outside in your “sleepwear”!

ilivetotravel Shira Camp with Mt. Kilimanjaro Olympus camera

A happy if tired hiker by his tent and the roof of Africa!  Wearing the merino wool mid layer and the synthetic down jacket.

Can I help you any more?

So, this is the run-down of the clothing for a hike of Mt. Kilimanjaro.  These are the things I got and used on the hike (and on the subsequent safari) and they served me very well.  Others may have different opinions or additional suggestions and I hope they will share those here.  Finally, I hope if you were not considering hiking Kili or were uncertain, check out my other posts on the topic (which I list below) and know that it is fairly attainable with good training and preparation!

——————————————————————————————————————————————–

Day 1 of the hike

Day 2 of the hike

Day 3 of the hike

Day 4 of the hike

Day 5 of the hike

Day 6 of the hike (summit night!)

Day 7 of the hike (going down!)

The Machame Route

7 Items you won’t see me without on Kili

 

Comments

  1. I live to travel is a great website for adventure travelers, Outdoor gears and Mountaineers.

    I live to travel provide useful information for mountain climbing like Kilimanjaro. Climbing kilimanjaro successful need proper climbing gears like clothing, trekking boots and tents.

  2. Thank you for the list of articles, and where to find them.

  3. You didn’t mention a silk liner for the sleeping bag? Did you not use one? Have been travelling with one in my sleeping bag for years and have found it to be of great benefit, especially where the climate changes so much as it would climbing Kilimanjaro.
    Anita Mac recently posted..Do You Geocache?My Profile

    • Great point, Anita. Worth saying some people may need that as it gets VERY cold. I was good without it plus the irradiating feature of my sleeoing back would work best if I had less between me and the inside of the sleeping bag itself.

  4. I remember going shopping for Mr O’s gear pre Everest and Kili. OMG!
    @mrsoaroundworld recently posted..A British Summer day in Salcombe, Devon, UKMy Profile

  5. It’s incredible how much preparation goes into this trek! Great advice here from someone who knows what he’s talking about. I don’t know if I’ll ever be doing this, but I enjoyed reading about… the sleeping bags, That’s because I’ve gotten into camping lately. :)
    Pola (@jettingaround) recently posted..Photo of the Week: Bookstore in Buenos AiresMy Profile

  6. Great list for those who might walk in your footsteps. I am a big fan of gaiters. I use them hiking and cross-country skiing, and I am sure I would use them climbing.
    Traveling Ted recently posted..Worst campsite ever in Hocking HillsMy Profile

  7. Since I own all of this gear, I think it’s time to FINALLY get my but to Kili!!! :)
    Erin at The World Wanderer recently posted..Music Monday: Pompeii.My Profile

  8. planning this kind of stuff is what we’re horrible at doing. can we recruit you for our next trip so you can research everything we need to pack??
    the lazy travelers recently posted..jetsetters: @ShortTravelTipsMy Profile

  9. If this trip ever crosses my path at least I know I have a cheat sheet here to prep for it!
    lola dimarco recently posted..How to have an Endless Summer…head to the Caribbean!My Profile

  10. This is great! I don’t see climbing Mt. Kilamanjaro anytime in my future BUT this is awesome information for anyone doing that hike or the like. I’m terrible at wearing weather appropriate clothing unless someone gives me some guidance and I know that it’s better to spend a few extra bucks on quality clothing to protect yourself. Good job!
    Samantha @mytanfeet recently posted..Confessions of an Expat: What Surprised Me About Living in Costa RicaMy Profile

    • Samantha, I NEVER thought of doing Kili. Friends and 3 glasses of wine roped me in! Yes, you are right that the quality stuff usually pays off – and one doesn’t need to be hiking a big mountain to benefit – just surviving a few polar expresses!! Stay warm!

  11. Great post! What an amazing experience…I’d love to do this one day. I’m with Samantha-I’m terrible at wearing weather appropriate clothing as well. Thanks for linking this up to the #SundayTraveler!
    A Southern Gypsy recently posted..Tips for Traveling When Sick: Make the Most of Your TripMy Profile

  12. Useful advice! Sound like it needs a lot of preparation – way more then what I’m used to. But the trip would be worth it.
    Jess recently posted..Sunday Traveler FavoritesMy Profile

  13. This is an excellent blog. The other packing tips I have read are just lists of items and don’t explain why/how the items are useful when climbing Kili. I like the idea of having a buff and balaclava too – keeps the neck and face warm. And I agree with having mitts over gloves to not separate the fingers. Didn’t expect it to get so cold in Africa!
    Kilimanjaro treks recently posted..Best Kilimanjaro Tour Operator vs. Right Kilimanjaro Climb CompanyMy Profile

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